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Envision Arlington/Mass. Climate Action Network (MCAN) Chapter

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This page includes content from the Climate Change News blog, which is maintained daily by David Landskov, and content from our old SA blog archives.

  • Toon of the Week - Global Climate Strike Sept 20

    Climate Change News Sep 21, 2019 | 22:06 pm

    Toon of the Week - Global Climate Strike Sept 20 2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #37

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  • Poster of the Week  What's scarier than spooky criters on Friday the 13th?

    Climate Change News Sep 21, 2019 | 22:00 pm

    Poster of the Week  What's scarier than spooky criters on Friday the 13th? 2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #37

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  • Friday 20

    Climate Change News Sep 21, 2019 | 21:53 pm

    Friday 20

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  • Kids Face Rising Health Risks from Climate Change, Doctors Warn as Juliana Case Returns to Court

    Climate Change News Sep 20, 2019 | 19:27 pm

    Kids Face Rising Health Risks from Climate Change, Doctors Warn as Juliana Case Returns to Court A federal appeals court heard arguments as the government tried again to get the children’s climate lawsuit dismissed. The 21 children and young adults suing the federal government over climate change argue that they and their generation are already suffering the consequences of climate change, from worsening allergies and asthma to the health risks and stress that come with hurricanes, wildfires and sea level rise threatening their homes.With the case back in court on Tuesday, some of the heaviest hitters in the public health arena—including 15 major health organization and two former U.S. surgeons general—have been publicly backing them up.Today's children will feel the health impacts of climate change into adulthood if the federal government doesn't transition away from fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, public health experts wrote in a letter published May 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), echoing a larger court brief signed onto by major health organizations. Read more at Kids Face Rising Health Risks from Climate Change, Doctors Warn as Juliana Case Returns to Court

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  • With Greenland's Extreme Melting, a New Risk Grows:  Ice Slabs that Worsen Runoff

    Climate Change News Sep 20, 2019 | 18:51 pm

    With Greenland's Extreme Melting, a New Risk Grows:  Ice Slabs that Worsen Runoff More meltwater is now pouring off these hardened surfaces and toward the ocean, a new study finds. That will have an impact on sea level rise. Scientists have added a new item to the long list of Greenland Ice Sheet woes.  Along with snow-darkening algae and increasing rainfall, giant slabs of ice have been thickening and spreading under the Greenland snow at an average rate of two football fields per minute since 2001, new research shows. The slabs prevent surface meltwater from trickling down and being absorbed by the snow.  Instead, more water pours off the surface of the ice sheet and into the ocean. That's speeding Greenland's contribution to sea level rise, said University of Liege climate researcher Xavier Fettweis, a co-author of a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.  "It is very likely that the current climate models overestimate the meltwater retention capacity of the ice sheet and underestimate the projected sea level rise coming from Greenland ... by a factor of two or three," he said. Read more at With Greenland's Extreme Melting, a New Risk Grows:  Ice Slabs that Worsen Runoff

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  • Thursday 19

    Climate Change News Sep 20, 2019 | 18:35 pm

    Thursday 19

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  • Trump:  We're Stripping California’s Right to Set Tougher Auto Standards

    Climate Change News Sep 19, 2019 | 04:30 am

    Trump:  We're Stripping California’s Right to Set Tougher Auto Standards Auto industry experts say the uncertainty would likely dampen the market for electric vehicles.  Nine other states could lose their tougher rules, too. President Donald Trump announced Wednesday that his administration would strip California of its authority to enact the nation's toughest auto pollution standards, setting the stage for an epic legal battle that could squelch the nascent U.S. market for petroleum-free vehicles at a critical time. The long-anticipated move, which Trump touted on Twitter just days before a United Nations summit on climate change, could prove to be his administration's most consequential policy retreat from efforts to rein in greenhouse gas emissions.  When coupled with the administration's planned freeze on fuel-economy improvements, it will negate one of the largest steps that any nation has made to cut carbon emissions. California has led the nation in a slow, but steady move toward electric vehicles—a turnover that experts believe is essential for gaining control of rising U.S. carbon emissions from transportation.  Nine other states have adopted its rules requiring automakers to sell a certain number of electric cars and trucks, based on each manufacturer's overall in-state sales. But California and those other states could now lose the power to enforce those zero-emissions vehicle requirements—at least temporarily. Auto industry experts and analysts expect the uncertainty that would create would dampen the market for zero-emissions vehicles. Improvements in U.S. fuel economy so far have not been sufficient to curb carbon emissions from transportation, which grew 1.2 percent in 2017 even as the nation's[…]

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  • Wednesday 18

    Climate Change News Sep 19, 2019 | 03:30 am

    Wednesday 18

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  • Cutting Air Pollution Would Not Cause ‘Near-Term Spike’ in Global Warming

    Climate Change News Sep 18, 2019 | 19:59 pm

    Cutting Air Pollution Would Not Cause ‘Near-Term Spike’ in Global Warming A reduction in air pollution brought about by shifting away from fossil fuels would not inadvertently cause a short-term acceleration of global warming, a new study says. Earlier modeling work using scenarios where fossil-fuel burning ends instantaneously had suggested that a rapid decline in aerosol emissions could remove their cooling impact on the climate and cause a spike in warming. However, the new study, published in Nature, finds that “even the most aggressive” shift from fossil fuels to clean alternatives to limit warming to 1.5C “provides benefits for climate change mitigation and air quality” at all timescales. The study makes the “clear and important point” that “aerosol cooling is no reason not to mitigate our emissions”, another scientist tells Carbon Brief, but “we need to be mindful of the potential regional climate implications of rapid removal of air pollution”. Read more at Cutting Air Pollution Would Not Cause ‘Near-Term Spike’ in Global Warming

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  • Carbon Emitters Face Higher Legal Risks

    Climate Change News Sep 18, 2019 | 19:50 pm

    Carbon Emitters Face Higher Legal Risks Climate change risk for big companies − and their investors − is often seen in terms of physical risk:  sea level rise, temperature increases, or extreme weather events.  But a spate of court cases around the world has highlighted a different kind of risk.  Carbon emitters, and the big investors that support them, could find themselves on the wrong end of the law if they don’t take action on climate change. 18 September, 2019 − When, two weeks ago, a New Zealand environmental activist started court action against our top carbon emitters, Kiwi companies became just the latest to find themselves under fire for not doing enough to stop climate change. Mike Smith, chair of the Climate Change Kiwi Leaders Group, hopes to force Fonterra, Genesis Energy, NZ Steel, NZ Refining, Z Energy, Dairy Holdings, and BT Mining to reduce their total net greenhouse gases by 50 percent by 2030.  Then he wants them to get them to zero by 2050. Smith’s action follows a case in Australia last year where a 23-year-old ecology graduate is suing his superannuation provider − $A50 billion fund REST − for not telling him what it’s doing to protect his savings from the impact of climate change. The year before, two Commonwealth Bank of Australia shareholders launched court action against the bank for not adequately disclosing climate change risks in its 2016 annual report. In the US a group of fishing companies are suing oil giant Chevron and others for their contribution to climate[…]

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