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Envision Arlington/Mass. Climate Action Network (MCAN) Chapter

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This page includes content from the Climate Change News blog, which is maintained daily by David Landskov, and content from our old SA blog archives.

  • EIA Projects US Energy-Related CO2 Emissions to Remain Near Current Level Through 2050; Increased Natural Gas Consumption

    Climate Change News Mar 23, 2019 | 05:00 am

    EIA Projects US Energy-Related CO2 Emissions to Remain Near Current Level Through 2050; Increased Natural Gas Consumption Carbon dioxide emissions from S energy consumption will remain near current levels through 2050, according to projections in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2019.  The AEO2019 Reference case, which reflects no changes to current laws and regulations and extends current trends in technology, projects that US energy-related CO2 emissions will be 5,019 million metric tons in 2050—4% below their 2018 value—as emissions associated with coal and petroleum consumption fall and emissions from natural gas consumption rise.Energy-related CO2 emissions generally follow energy consumption trends.  In the United States emissions associated with the consumption of petroleum fuels—motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and more—have consistently made up the largest portion of CO2 emissions.  In 2018, the transportation sector’s consumption accounted for 78% of US CO2 emissions from petroleum and more than one-third of all US energy-related CO2 emissions.Petroleum emissions from other sectors have fallen in recent years as equipment and processes that use petroleum fuels have been replaced by those using other fuels, in particular, natural gas.In the transportation sector, consumption and emissions trends in the past have been driven by changes in travel demand, fuel prices, and fuel economy regulations.  In EIA’s AEO2019 Reference case projection, current fuel economy standards stop requiring additional efficiency improvements in 2025 for light-duty vehicles and in 2027 for heavy-duty vehicles, reflecting existing regulations.  As travel demand continues to rise, transportation consumption and emissions increase.Read more at EIA Projects US Energy-Related CO2 Emissions to Remain Near Current Level Through 2050; Increased Natural Gas Consumption

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  • Editorial Cartoonists Lampoon, Praise Green New Deal

    Climate Change News Mar 23, 2019 | 04:25 am

    Editorial Cartoonists Lampoon, Praise Green New Deal Editorial Cartoonists Lampoon, Praise Green New Deal

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  • Friday 22

    Climate Change News Mar 23, 2019 | 03:50 am

    Friday 22

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  • Thursday 21

    Climate Change News Mar 23, 2019 | 03:16 am

    Thursday 21

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  • Climate Change's Fingerprints Are on U.S. Midwest Floods:  Scientists

    Climate Change News Mar 22, 2019 | 05:00 am

    Climate Change's Fingerprints Are on U.S. Midwest Floods:  Scientists Climate change played a hand in the deadly floods in the U.S. upper Midwest that have damaged crops and drowned livestock, scientists said on Thursday, while a Trump administration official said more homework was needed before making that link. The “bomb cyclone” that dumped rain on Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri and killed at least four people now threatens a wider region downstream of swollen rivers and smashed levees. Manmade greenhouse gases trap heat in the atmosphere, warming the oceans and making the air above them more humid, scientists said.  When a storm picks up and eventually spits out that moisture, it can be devastating for people caught below. “The atmosphere is pretty close to fully saturated, it’s got all the water it can take,” said Michael Wehner, a senior scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Big storms like the bomb cyclone and Hurricane Harvey, which smacked Houston in 2017 with record downpours, are where the impact of climate change can most clearly be seen, he said, adding that climate change’s fingerprints were all over the recent storm. Read more at Climate Change's Fingerprints Are on U.S. Midwest Floods:  Scientists

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  • Rivers Gain Legal Protection from Misuse

    Climate Change News Mar 22, 2019 | 03:48 am

    Rivers Gain Legal Protection from Misuse Several countries are ensuring their rivers can gain legal protection, a move akin to treating them as people, which could help nature more widely. So Old Man River is getting a day in court:  a growing international initiative is seeing to it that rivers gain legal protection against pollution and other forms of exploitation, in a move which insists that they have rights just as people do. There are hopes that protecting rivers (and one lake) in this way could in time be extended to living species and to other features of the natural world. The first river to win this legal safeguard is the Whanganui in New Zealand, which in March 2017 gained recognition as holding rights and responsibilities equivalent to a person.  (The country had in 2014 already granted legal personhood to a forest.)  The river – or rather, those acting for it – will now be able to sue for protection under the law. The Te Awa Tupua (Whanganui River Claims Settlement) Act 2017 recognizes the river and all its tributaries as a single entity, Te Awa Tupua, which has rights and interests and is the owner of its own river bed.  The river can both sue and be sued.  The Act also acknowledges the river as a living whole that stretches from the mountains to the sea. Read more at Rivers Gain Legal Protection from Misuse

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  • U.S. Judge Blocks Drilling over Climate Change, Casting Doubt on Trump Agenda

    Climate Change News Mar 21, 2019 | 04:10 am

    U.S. Judge Blocks Drilling over Climate Change, Casting Doubt on Trump Agenda A U.S. judge has blocked oil drilling planned in Wyoming because the government failed to adequately consider its impact on global warming - a decision that could complicate President Donald Trump’s broader efforts to expand oil, gas and coal output on America’s public lands. The ruling, by Judge Rudolph Contreras of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, was issued late on Tuesday, according to court documents. It blocked drilling on more than 300,000 acres (121,400 hectares) in Wyoming until the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management conducts further analyses about how the development would impact climate change. “Having reviewed the record and the relevant law, the Court concludes that - withholding judgment on whether BLM’s leasing decisions were correct - BLM did not sufficiently consider climate change when making those decisions,” Judge Contreras wrote in the order. Read more at U.S. Judge Blocks Drilling over Climate Change, Casting Doubt on Trump Agenda

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  • Wednesday 20

    Climate Change News Mar 21, 2019 | 03:50 am

    Wednesday 20

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  • New Global Standard Counts the Cost of Environmental Damage

    Climate Change News Mar 19, 2019 | 04:10 am

    New Global Standard Counts the Cost of Environmental Damage Environmental damage costs society enormous amounts of money - and often leaves future generations to foot the bill.  Now, a new ISO standard will help companies valuate and manage the impact of their environmental damage, by providing a clear figure for the cost of their goods and services to the environment. We know what goods and services cost us, but what does the environment pay?  For many years now, this question has been the focus of several global companies and researchers at the Swedish Life Cycle Center, a competence center hosted by Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.  For as long as 30 years, they have been using the so-called 'EPS tool ' to place a monetary value on environmental damage. Over the past three years, Bengt Steen, Professor Emeritus at Chalmers, has led the development of a new ISO standard for monetary valuation.  The work has been in collaboration with AB Volvo, Essity, Nouryon (formerly Akzo Nobel Specialty Chemicals), and the IVL Swedish Environmental Institute.  The initiative was taken by Swedish Life Cycle Center. Read more at New Global Standard Counts the Cost of Environmental Damage

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  • Monday 18

    Climate Change News Mar 19, 2019 | 03:50 am

    Monday 18

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