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Arlington Vision 2020 Committee/Mass. Climate Action Network (MCAN) Chapter

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Paint the Town Green

Celebrate Arlington’s Path to a Sustainable Future

Sunday, September 23, 2018 - 3-5 p

Arlington Town Hall, 730 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, MA

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This page includes content from the Climate Change News blog, which is maintained daily by David Landskov, and content from our old SA blog archives.

  • Walmart Procures 233-MW Wind-Energy PPA from EDP Renewables

    Climate Change News Oct 17, 2018 | 07:20 am

    Walmart Procures 233-MW Wind-Energy PPA from EDP Renewables Retail giant Walmart signed a deal for 233 MW of utility-scale wind power from EDP Renewables, the companies announced Tuesday. The deal with Bentonville, Arkansas-based Walmart includes three wind farms—all developed, owned and operated by EDP Renewables—in the states of Illinois and Indiana. The PPA details are as follows:123 MW from the Bright Stalk Wind Farm (a 205 MW project in McLean County, Illinois, with start of operations expected in 2019;60 MW from the Headwaters II Wind Farm (a 200 MW project in Randolph County, Indiana, with start of operations expected in 2020;50 MW from the Harvest Ridge Wind Farm, formerly Broadlands Wind Farm (a 200 MW project in Douglas County, Illinois, with start of operations expected in 2019.“Walmart has a goal to be supplied by 100 percent renewable energy and sourcing energy from wind farms developed by partners like EDP Renewables is a core component in the mix,” said Mark Vanderhelm, vice president of energy for Walmart.  “Wind energy is an important part of our energy portfolio, and Walmart plans to continue our efforts to pursue renewable energy projects that are right for our customers, our business, and the environment.”      “The declining cost of renewable power has led to an increase in clean energy procurement from companies like Walmart in recent years.  The continued commitment from corporate entities in procuring renewable energy speaks volumes about the importance and value of securing fixed, competitive pricing over the long-term,” said Miguel Prado, EDP Renewables North America CEO.  “EDP Renewables[…]

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  • Tuesday 16

    Climate Change News Oct 17, 2018 | 06:30 am

    Tuesday 16

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  • Monday 15

    Climate Change News Oct 16, 2018 | 03:50 am

    Monday 15

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  • U.S. Automakers Double Down on Trucks & SUVs, Despite Talk of a Cleaner Future

    Climate Change News Oct 15, 2018 | 17:22 pm

    U.S. Automakers Double Down on Trucks & SUVs, Despite Talk of a Cleaner Future The automakers say they’re headed for an all-electric future and they want fuel economy standards, but their assembly lines tell a different story. A year ago, General Motors laid out a bold vision for a transition to a zero-emissions future.  It announced plans for 20 new electric vehicle models by 2023, and CEO Mary Barra wrote:  "Our generation has the ambition, the talent and the technology to realize the safer, better and more sustainable world we want." But in the U.S. market, GM was aggressively transforming its product line for something else—it was scaling back on cars and doubling down on higher-emissions pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles. SUVs and other light trucks now make up more than three-quarters of GM's passenger vehicle sales in the U.S., up from less than 60 percent five years ago.  The majority of the 20 planned electric car models are destined for China, where the government has new EV mandates.  The company has announced no plans for electric versions of any of the big vehicles that are its best sellers in the U.S. "We have ... successfully transitioned to a crossover- and truck-focused business," Kurt McNeil, U.S. vice president of Sales Operations said in a statement to investors early this year. GM is not alone.  All of the Big Three automakers—GM, Ford, and Fiat Chrysler—have shifted toward big, heavy vehicles that drink more fuel per mile.  In fact, they were in last place for fuel economy among the 13 automakers selling in the U.S.[…]

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  • Hurricanes Like Michael Show Why We Can’t Ignore Climate Change

    Climate Change News Oct 15, 2018 | 06:30 am

    Hurricanes Like Michael Show Why We Can’t Ignore Climate Change The deadly storm came just days after a report on global warming. This past week was a grim one in climate history, by any measure. First, an international group of scientists released a long-anticipated report detailing in excruciating detail the extra damages we can expect unless we slam our foot on the fossil fuel brakes right now.  Then, just a few days later, record-breaking Hurricane Michael came barreling out of the Gulf of Mexico with a late-breaking intensification that transformed the Florida Panhandle into a landscape straight out of a horror movie. The fact that both events occurred within a few days of each other is pure coincidence, of course.  But it does leave the feeling that Nature just put one or more planetary-scale exclamation marks on the main takeaway from the IPCC report:  Act now to reduce emissions, or suffer the consequences! The real exclamation point from Michael, though, is the same one that came with its close relatives Katrina, Sandy, Harvey, Maria, and Florence — all supercharged by man-made climate change to some degree:  We are exceptionally ill-prepared for the climate threats that are unfolding today, let alone those of the next decades.  Rising seas caused by warming and rising oceans and melting ice are already bringing low-lying coastlines under threat from so-called “blue sky flooding.”  And studies now show that there are plenty of reasons to think that hurricanes will get stronger, and wetter, under continued climate change, as the ocean and the overlying atmosphere warm. As[…]

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  • Mary Robinson on Climate Change:‘Feeling “This Is Too Big for Me” Is No Use to Anybody’

    Climate Change News Oct 15, 2018 | 05:45 am

    Mary Robinson on Climate Change:‘Feeling “This Is Too Big for Me” Is No Use to Anybody’ The former president of Ireland has a new raison d’être: saving the planet. Yet, despite the dire warnings of this week’s IPCC report, she is surprisingly upbeat.On the morning that the world’s leading climate scientists warn that the planet has until 2030 to avert a global warming catastrophe, Mary Robinson appears suitably sombre.  She wears black shoes, black trousers, and a black sweater and perches at the end of a long table at her climate justice foundation, headquartered in an austere, imposing Georgian building opposite Trinity College Dublin....“Governments are not responding at all adequately to the stark reality that the IPCC is pointing to:  that we have about 11 years to make really significant change,” says Robinson, sitting ramrod straight, all business.  “This report is extraordinarily important, because it’s telling us that 2 degrees is not safe.  It’s beyond safe.  Therefore, we have to work much, much harder to stay at 1.5 degrees.  I’ve seen what 1 degree is doing in more vulnerable countries ... villages are having to move, there’s slippage, there’s seawater incursion.” Robinson sips a glass of water and sighs.  “We’re in a bumpy time.  We’re in a bad political cycle, particularly because the United States is not only not giving leadership, but is being disruptive of multilateralism and is encouraging populism in other countries.” This could be the start of a depressing interview that concludes we should hitch a ride on Virgin Galactic’s first trip to space and try to stay there.  But it turns out[…]

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  • Toon of the Week - Trump lights cigar with burning copy of UN Climate Report

    Climate Change News Oct 15, 2018 | 04:55 am

    Toon of the Week - Trump lights cigar with burning copy of UN Climate Report Read more here.

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  • Poster of the Week - Toto, I Think the Climate Has Changed!

    Climate Change News Oct 15, 2018 | 04:10 am

    Poster of the Week - Toto, I Think the Climate Has Changed! Read original here

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  • Sunday 14

    Climate Change News Oct 15, 2018 | 03:51 am

    Sunday 14

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  • Flash Flood Risks Grow as Downpours Get More Intense

    Climate Change News Oct 13, 2018 | 19:19 pm

    Flash Flood Risks Grow as Downpours Get More Intense If you’ve noticed that torrential rain storms are getting more common, you’re right. Andreas Prein of the National Center for Atmospheric Research says the amount of rain that falls during the most intense storms is increasing all over the country.  The change is most extreme in northeastern states … Prein:  “… where we have up to seventy percent higher intensities of rainfall than we had fifty years ago.” One of the reasons is that warmer air can hold more evaporated water.  So as temperatures increase, clouds can hold more moisture, which means more water can fall in a single storm. And with more intense storms comes an increased risk of flash floods, which can threaten lives and damage property. Prein says the risks are particularly great in urban areas.  That’s because, with more paved surfaces and less vegetation, cities have fewer areas that can absorb stormwater.  So flooding is more likely. Prein:  “Therefore urbanized areas have to update their infrastructure to be more prepared for flash flooding, and we have to try to limit global warming to a certain extent that the consequences don’t get unmanageable.” Read original at Flash Flood Risks Grow as Downpours Get More Intense

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